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2019 MN H 824
Author: Kunesh-Podein
Version: Introduced
Version Date: 02/07/2019

HF 824

as introduced - 91st Legislature (2019 - 2020) Posted on 02/07/2019

A bill for an act relating to education; providing funding for and strengthening the Increase Teachers of Color Act; seeking to double the number of teachers of color and American Indian teachers in Minnesota; requiring reports; appropriating money; amending Minnesota Statutes 2018, sections 120B.11, subdivisions 2, 3; 122A.185, subdivision 1; 122A.63, subdivisions 1, 4, 5, 6, by adding a subdivision; 122A.70; 124D.09, subdivision 10; 124D.861, subdivision 2; 136A.1275; 136A.1791, subdivisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5; proposing coding for new law in Minnesota Statutes, chapters 120B; 122A; 136A.

BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF MINNESOTA:

Section 1. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 120B.11, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

Subd. 2. Adopting plans and budgets. A school board, at a public meeting, shall must adopt a comprehensive, long-term strategic plan to support and improve teaching and learning that is aligned with creating the world's best workforce and includes:

(1) clearly defined district and school site goals and benchmarks for instruction and student achievement for all student subgroups identified in section 120B.35, subdivision 3, paragraph (b), clause (2);

(2) a process to assess and evaluate each student's progress toward meeting state and local academic standards, assess and identify students to participate in gifted and talented programs and accelerate their instruction, and adopt early-admission procedures consistent with section 120B.15, and identifying the strengths and weaknesses of instruction in pursuit of student and school success and curriculum affecting students' progress and growth toward career and college readiness and leading to the world's best workforce;

(3) a system to periodically review and evaluate the effectiveness of all instruction and curriculum, taking into account strategies and best practices, student outcomes, school principal evaluations under section 123B.147, subdivision 3, students' access to effective teachers who are members of populations underrepresented among the licensed teachers in the district or school and who reflect the diversity of enrolled students under section 120B.35, subdivision 3, paragraph (b), clause (2), and teacher evaluations under section 122A.40, subdivision 8, or 122A.41, subdivision 5;

(4) strategies for improving instruction, curriculum, and student achievement, including: (i) the English and, where practicable, the native language development and the academic achievement of English learners and (ii) for all learners, access to culturally relevant or ethnic studies curriculum using culturally responsive methodologies;

(5) a process to examine the equitable distribution of teachers and strategies to ensure children from low-income and minority children families, families of color, and American Indian families are not taught at higher rates than other children by inexperienced, ineffective, or out-of-field teachers;

(6) education effectiveness practices that integrate high-quality instruction, ; rigorous curriculum, ; technology, ; inclusive and respectful learning and work environments for all students, families, and employees; and a collaborative professional culture that develops and supports retains qualified, racially and ethnically diverse staff effective at working with diverse students while developing and supporting teacher quality, performance, and effectiveness; and

(7) an annual budget for continuing to implement the district plan.

EFFECTIVE DATE. This section is effective for all strategic plans reviewed and updated after the day of final enactment.

Sec. 2. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 120B.11, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

Subd. 3. District advisory committee. Each school board shall must establish an advisory committee to ensure active community participation in all phases of planning and improving the instruction and curriculum affecting state and district academic standards, consistent with subdivision 2. A district advisory committee, to the extent possible, shall must reflect the diversity of the district and its school sites, include teachers, parents, support staff, students, and other community residents, and provide translation to the extent appropriate and practicable. The district advisory committee shall must pursue community support to accelerate the academic and native literacy and achievement of English learners with varied needs, from young children to adults, consistent with section 124D.59, subdivisions 2 and 2a. The district may establish site teams as subcommittees of the district advisory committee under subdivision 4. The district advisory committee shall must recommend to the school board: rigorous academic standards, ; student achievement goals and measures consistent with subdivision 1a and sections 120B.022, subdivisions 1a and 1b, and 120B.35, ; district assessments, ; means to improve students' equitable access to effective and more diverse teachers, ; strategies to ensure the curriculum and learning and work environments are inclusive and respectful toward all racial and ethnic groups; and program evaluations. School sites may expand upon district evaluations of instruction, curriculum, assessments, or programs. Whenever possible, parents and other community residents shall must comprise at least two-thirds of advisory committee members.

Sec. 3. [120B.113] INCLUSIVE SCHOOL ENHANCEMENT GRANTS.

Subdivision 1. Grant program established. The commissioner must establish a grant program to support implementation of world's best workforce strategies under section 120B.11, subdivision 2, clauses (4) and (6), to support collaborative efforts to make school climate and curriculum more inclusive and respectful toward all students, families, and employees, especially those of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds.

Subd. 2. Applications and grant awards. The commissioner must determine application procedures and deadlines, select schools to participate in the grant program, and determine the payment process and amount of the grants. To the extent there are sufficient applications, the commissioner should award an approximately equal number of grants between districts in greater Minnesota and those in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. If there are an insufficient number of applications received for either geographic area, then the commissioner may award grants to meet the requests for funds wherever a district is located.

Subd. 3. Description. The grant program must provide funding that supports collaborative efforts to make schools' curriculum and learning and work environments more inclusive and respectful of students' racial and ethnic diversity and to address issues of structural inequities in schools that create opportunity and achievement gaps for students, families, and staff who are of color or who are American Indian, consistent with the requirements for long-term plans under section 124D.861, subdivision 2, paragraph (c).

Subd. 4. Report. Grant recipients must annually report to the commissioner by a date and in a form and manner determined by the commissioner on efforts planned and implemented that engaged students, families, educators, and community members of diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds in making improvements to school climate and curriculum. The report must assess the impact of those efforts as perceived by racially and ethnically diverse stakeholders as well as areas needed for further continuous improvement.

EFFECTIVE DATE. This section is effective July 1, 2019.

Sec. 4. [120B.117] INCREASING THE PERCENTAGE OF TEACHERS OF COLOR AND AMERICAN INDIAN TEACHERS IN MINNESOTA.

Subdivision 1. Purpose. In order to address students' and families' persistent inequitable access to diverse teachers, this section sets short-term and long-term state goals for increasing the percentage of teachers of color and American Indian teachers in Minnesota toward ensuring all students have equitable access to effective and diverse teachers who reflect the diversity of students. The goals and report required under this section are also important for meeting state goals for the world's best workforce under section 120B.11, achievement and integration under section 124D.861, and higher education attainment under section 135A.012, all of which have been established to close persistent opportunity and achievement gaps that limit students' success in school and life and impede the state's economic growth.

Subd. 2. Equitable access to diverse teachers. The percentage of teachers who are of color or American Indian in Minnesota should increase at least two percentage points per year to have a teaching workforce that more closely reflects the state's increasingly diverse student population and ensure all students have equitable access to effective and diverse teachers by 2040.

Subd. 3. Rights not created. The attainment goal in this section is not to the exclusion of any other goals and does not confer a right or create a claim for any person.

Subd. 4. Reporting. Beginning in 2019 and every odd-numbered year thereafter, the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must collaborate with the Department of Education and the Office of Higher Education to collate and summarize reports from the programs they each administer and any other programs receiving state appropriations that have or include an explicit purpose of increasing the racial and ethnic diversity of the state's teacher workforce to more closely reflect the diversity of students. The report must include programs under sections 120B.113, 122A.2451, 122A.59, 122A.63, 122A.635, 122A.685, 122A.70, 124D.09, 124D.861, 136A.1274, 136A.1275, and 136A.1791, along with any other programs or initiatives that receive state appropriations to address the shortage of teachers of color and American Indian teachers. The board must report on the effectiveness of state-funded programs to increase the recruitment, preparation, licensing, hiring, and retention of racially and ethnically diverse teachers and the state's progress toward meeting or exceeding the goals of this section. The report must also include recommendations for state policy and funding needed to achieve the goals of this section, as well as plans for sharing the report and activities of grant recipients, and opportunities among grant recipients of various programs to share effective practices with each other. The 2019 report must include a recommendation of whether or not a state advisory council should be established to address the shortage of racially and ethnically diverse teachers and what the composition and charge of such an advisory council would be if established. The board must consult with the state Indian Affairs and ethnic councils along with other community and stakeholder groups, including students of color, in developing the report. By October 1 of each odd-numbered year, the board must submit the report to the chairs and ranking minority members of the legislative committees with jurisdiction over education and higher education policy and finance. The report must be available to the public on the board's website.

Sec. 5. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 122A.185, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

Subdivision 1. Tests. (a) The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must adopt rules requiring a candidate to demonstrate a passing score on a board-adopted examination of skills in reading, writing, and mathematics before being granted a Tier 4 teaching license under section 122A.184 to provide direct instruction to pupils in elementary, secondary, or special education programs. An employing school or district may verify through satisfactory overall job performance a Tier 3 teacher's skills in reading, writing, and mathematics for teaching in the licensure field so the teacher may obtain a Tier 4 license.Candidates may obtain a Tier 1, Tier 2, or Tier 3 license to provide direct instruction to pupils in elementary, secondary, or special education programs if candidates meet the other requirements in section 122A.181, 122A.182, or 122A.183, respectively. All testing centers must provide monthly opportunities for untimed skills examinations and must advertise those opportunities on the test registration website.

(b) The board must adopt rules requiring candidates for Tier 3 and Tier 4 licenses to pass an examination of general pedagogical knowledge and examinations of licensure field specific content. The content examination requirement does not apply if no relevant content exam exists. All testing centers must provide monthly opportunities for untimed pedagogy and content examinations and must advertise those opportunities on the test registration website.

(c) Candidates for initial Tier 3 and Tier 4 licenses to teach elementary students must pass test items assessing the candidates' knowledge, skill, and ability in comprehensive, scientifically based reading instruction under section 122A.06, subdivision 4, knowledge and understanding of the foundations of reading development, development of reading comprehension and reading assessment and instruction, and the ability to integrate that knowledge and understanding into instruction strategies under section 122A.06, subdivision 4.

(d) The requirement to pass a board-adopted reading, writing, and mathematics skills examination does not apply to nonnative English speakers, as verified by qualified Minnesota school district personnel or Minnesota higher education faculty, who, after meeting the content and pedagogy requirements under this subdivision, apply for a teaching license to provide direct instruction in their native language or world language instruction under section 120B.022, subdivision 1.

EFFECTIVE DATE. This section is effective January 1, 2020.

Sec. 6. [122A.59] COME TEACH IN MINNESOTA HIRING BONUSES.

Subdivision 1. Purpose. This section establishes a program to support districts and schools recruiting and offering hiring bonuses for licensed teachers from another state in order to meet staffing needs in shortage areas in economic development regions in Minnesota.

Subd. 2. Eligibility. Districts or schools must verify that the hiring bonus is given to teachers licensed in another state who:

(1) qualify for a Tier 3 Minnesota license;

(2) have moved to the economic development region in Minnesota where they were hired; and

(3) belong to a racial or ethnic group that is underrepresented among teachers compared to students in the district or school under section 120B.35, subdivision 3, paragraph (b), clause (2).

Subd. 3. Bonus amount. Districts or schools may offer a signing and retention bonus of up to $5,000 to teachers who meet the eligibility requirements. Teachers who meet eligibility requirements and meet a licensure shortage area in the economic development region of the state where the school is located may be offered a signing bonus of up to $8,000. Teachers must be paid half of the bonus when starting employment and half after completing four years of service in the hiring district or school. Teachers who do not complete their first school year upon receiving a hiring bonus must repay the hiring bonus.

Subd. 4. Administration. The commissioner must establish a process for districts or schools to seek reimbursement for hiring bonuses given to teachers in shortage areas moving to and working in Minnesota schools experiencing specific shortages.

EFFECTIVE DATE. This section applies to teacher contracts entered into on or after July 1, 2019.

Sec. 7. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 122A.63, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

Subdivision 1. Establishment. (a) A grant program is established to assist American Indian people to become teachers and to provide additional education for American Indian teachers. The commissioner may award a joint grant to each of the following:

(1) the Duluth campus of the University of Minnesota and Independent School District No. 709, Duluth;

(2) Bemidji State University and Independent School District No. 38, Red Lake;

(3) Moorhead State University and one of the school districts located within the White Earth Reservation; and

(4) Augsburg College, Independent School District No. 625, St. Paul, and Special School District No. 1, Minneapolis.

(b) If additional funds are available, the commissioner may award additional joint grants to other postsecondary institutions and school districts.

(c) Grantees may enter into contracts with tribal, technical, and community colleges and four-year postsecondary institutions to identify and provide grants to students at those institutions interested in the field of education. Each grantee is eligible to and may contract with partner institutions to provide professional development and supplemental services to a tribal, technical, or community college or four-year postsecondary institution, including identification of prospective students, provision of instructional supplies and materials, and provision of grant money to students. A contract with a tribal, technical, or community college or four-year postsecondary institution includes coordination of student identification, professional development, and mentorship services.

Sec. 8. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 122A.63, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

Subd. 4. Grant amount. The commissioner may award a joint grant in the amount it determines to be appropriate. The grant shall must include money for the postsecondary institution, school district, and student scholarships, and student loans.

Sec. 9. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 122A.63, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

Subd. 5. Information to student applicants. At the time a student applies for a scholarship and loan, the student shall must be provided information about the fields of licensure needed by school districts in the part of the state within which the district receiving the joint grant is located. The information shall must be acquired and periodically updated by the recipients of the joint grant and their contracted partner institutions. Information provided to students shall must clearly state that scholarship and loan decisions are not based upon the field of licensure selected by the student.

Sec. 10. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 122A.63, subdivision 6, is amended to read:

Subd. 6. Eligibility for scholarships and loans. (a) The following American Indian people are eligible for scholarships:

(1) a student having origins in any of the original peoples of North America and maintaining cultural identification through tribal affiliation or community recognition;

(1) (2) a student, including a teacher aide employed by a district receiving a joint grant or their contracted partner school, who intends to become a teacher or who is interested in the field of education and who is enrolled in a postsecondary institution or their contracted partner institutions receiving a joint grant;

(2) (3) a licensed employee of a district receiving a joint grant or a contracted partner institution, who is enrolled in a master of education program; and

(3) (4) a student who, after applying for federal and state financial aid and an Indian scholarship according to section 136A.126, has financial needs that remain unmet. Financial need shall must be determined according to the congressional methodology for needs determination or as otherwise set in federal law.

A person who has actual living expenses in addition to those addressed by the congressional methodology for needs determination, or as otherwise set in federal law, may receive a loan according to criteria established by the commissioner. A contract shall be executed between the state and the student for the amount and terms of the loan. (b) Priority must be given to a student who is tribally enrolled and then to first- and second-generation descendants.

Sec. 11. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 122A.63, is amended by adding a subdivision to read:

Subd. 9. Eligible programming. (a) The grantee institutions and their contracted partner institutions may provide scholarships to students progressing toward educational goals in any area of teacher licensure, including an associate of arts, bachelor's, master's, or doctoral degree in the following:

(1) any educational certification necessary for employment;

(2) early childhood family education or prekindergarten licensure;

(3) elementary and secondary education;

(4) school administration; or

(5) any educational program that provides services to American Indian students in prekindergarten through grade 12.

(b) For purposes of recruitment, the grantees or their contracted partner institutions must agree to work with their respective organizations to hire an American Indian work-study student or other American Indian staff to conduct initial information queries and to contact persons working in schools to provide programming regarding education professions to high school students who may be interested in education as a profession.

(c) At least 80 percent of the grants awarded under this section must be used for student scholarships. No more than 20 percent of the grants awarded under this section may be used for recruitment or administration of the student scholarships.

Sec. 12. [122A.635] COLLABORATIVE URBAN AND GREATER MINNESOTA EDUCATORS OF COLOR GRANT PROGRAM.

Subdivision 1. Purpose. Competitive grants awarded to higher education institutions under this section are to develop, expand, and maintain targeted recruitment, retention, and induction support directly to teacher candidates who are of color or who are American Indian in collaboration with local schools and communities in order to address the wide gap between the demographics of students and teachers and to ensure that all students from early childhood through grade 12 have equitable access to effective and diverse teachers under section 120B.11, subdivision 3.

Subd. 2. Competitive grants. (a) The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must award grants to maximize the number of teacher candidates who are of color or are American Indian and who are well-prepared to enter the profession with Tier 3 licensure and to support the development and learning of children and youth from early childhood through grade 12. Grants must only be awarded to institutions offering teacher preparation programs approved by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board. Grants must be awarded based on:

(1) the number of teacher candidates being supported in the program who are of color or who are American Indian;

(2) program outcomes, including graduation or program completion rates, licensure rates, and placement rates, and, for each outcome measure, the number of those teacher candidates who are of color or who are American Indian; and

(3) the percent of racially and ethnically diverse teacher candidates participating at the institution compared to:

(i) the total percent of students of color and American Indian students enrolled at the institution, regardless of major; and

(ii) the percent of underrepresented racially and ethnically diverse teachers in the economic development region of the state where the institution is located and where a shortage of diverse teachers exists, as reported under section 127A.05, subdivision 6.

(b) Priority for awarding continuing grants under this section must be given to sustain and strengthen existing programs at institutions that have received program grants in the past and have demonstrated continuing success at recruiting, retaining, graduating, and inducting teacher candidates who are of color or who are American Indian.

(c) Award amounts for maintenance and expansion of programs must be determined by the board based on the number of candidates supported, sustaining support for those candidates, and the funds available.

(d) Development of new, innovative programs must be awarded competitive grants under this section as determined by the board, and subsequent funding must be determined based on the same criteria for continuing grants under paragraph (b).

Subd. 3. Grant program administration. The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board may enter in an interagency agreement with the Office of Higher Education, including a transfer of funds to the Office of Higher Education, to help establish and administer the competitive grant process. The board must award grants to both public and private institutions as well as institutions located in various economic development regions throughout the state, but must not predetermine the number of institutions to be awarded grants under this section or set a limit for the amount that any one institution may receive as part of the competitive grant application process. All grants must be awarded by August 15 of the fiscal year in which the grants are to be used except that, for initial competitive grants awarded for fiscal year 2020, grants must be awarded by September 15. Grant money may be used over a two- to four-year period to support teacher candidates.

Subd. 4. Account established. A collaborative urban and greater Minnesota educator of color account is created in the special revenue fund for depositing money appropriated to or received by the board for the program. Money deposited in the account is appropriated to the board, does not cancel, and is continuously available for grants under this section.

Subd. 5. Report. By January 15 of each year, each institution awarded a grant under this section must prepare for the legislature and the board a detailed report regarding the funds used to recruit, retain, and induct teacher candidates who are of color or who are American Indian. The report must include the total number of teacher candidates of color, disaggregated by race or ethnic group, who are recruited to the institution, are newly admitted to the licensure program, are enrolled in the licensure program, have completed student teaching, have graduated, are licensed, and are newly employed as Minnesota teachers in their licensure field. The total number of teacher candidates who are of color or who are American Indian at each stage from recruitment to licensed teaching must be reported as a percentage of total candidates seeking the same licensure at the institution. The board must also publish a report for the public that summarizes the activities and outcomes of grant recipients and what was done to promote sharing of effective practices among grant recipients.

Sec. 13. [122A.685] GROW YOUR OWN PATHWAYS TO TEACHER LICENSURE GRANTS.

Subdivision 1. Purpose. Grants awarded under this section are for school districts and charter schools throughout Minnesota to develop or expand Grow Your Own teacher programs.

Subd. 2. Definition. For purposes of this section, "Grow Your Own programs" means programs within schools, districts, or communities in partnership with Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board-approved teacher preparation programs and often with community-based organizations designed to provide a pathway to teaching at any level from early childhood to secondary school for paraprofessionals, cultural liaisons, other nonlicensed employees, secondary school students, parents, or members of the local communities served by the school or district.

Subd. 3. Nonconventional teacher residency programs. (a) School districts, charter schools, or cooperatives may apply for grants under this section to fund established and effective Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board-approved nonconventional teacher residency programs. The programs must provide tuition scholarships or stipends to enable school district and charter school employees or community members seeking a teaching license who are of color or American Indian to participate in a nonconventional teacher preparation program. If extra awarded grant funds are available, districts and schools may use remaining grant funds to provide tuition scholarships to employees who are not persons of color or American Indian if they are seeking to teach in a licensure area that is identified by the board as experiencing a shortage within the economic development region where the district or school is located.

(b) School districts and charter schools that receive funds under this subdivision must have a program to recruit and retain candidates of color or American Indian candidates so that at least 50 percent of those who participate in the residency programs are persons of color or American Indian. Priority for awarding grants must be given to programs with the highest total numbers and percentages of participants who are of color or American Indian and those that have a percentage of participants who are of color or American Indian that meets or exceeds the overall percentage of students of color or American Indian students in the district, school, or cooperative.

(c) School districts and charter schools providing financial support to new teacher candidates under this subdivision may require a commitment from the candidates, as determined by each district or school, to teach in the district or school for a reasonable amount of time not to exceed five years.

Subd. 4. Expanded Grow Your Own programs. (a) School districts, charter schools, cooperatives as defined in section 123A.21, community-based organizations led by and for communities of color or American Indian communities, and Head Start programs under section 119A.50 may apply for grants under this section to provide financial assistance, mentoring, and other experiences to enable persons who are of color or who are American Indian to become teachers.

(b) Grants awarded under this subdivision must be used for:

(1) tuition scholarships or stipends to eligible teaching assistants, cultural liaisons, or other nonlicensed employees who are of color or who are American Indian and are enrolled in any Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board-approved teacher preparation program;

(2) developing and implementing innovative school-based residency programs or other types of programs emphasizing clinical experiences in any district, cooperative, or charter school for nonlicensed employees who are of color or who are American Indian seeking a teaching license in collaboration with a conventional or nonconventional Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board-approved program;

(3) developing pathway programs that provide stipends and tuition scholarships to parents and community members who are of color or who are American Indian to change careers and obtain a Tier 3 license to teach in schools or other credential needed to teach in a Head Start program; or

(4) developing innovative programs that encourage secondary school students to pursue teaching, including developing and offering dual-credit postsecondary course options in schools for "Introduction to Teaching" or "Introduction to Education" courses consistent with section 124D.09, subdivision 10, and supporting future teacher clubs involving middle and high school students who are of color or who are American Indian to have experiential learning supporting the success of younger students or peers and to increase their interest in pursuing a teaching career.

(c) School districts, charter schools, and Head Start programs providing financial assistance to individuals under this subdivision may require a commitment from the individuals, as determined by each district or school, to teach in the district or school for a reasonable amount of time not to exceed five years.

Subd. 5. Grant procedure. (a) A school district, charter school, cooperative, or Head Start program must apply for a grant under this section in the form and manner specified by the commissioner of education. To be eligible, grant recipients must ensure that the percentage of participants who are of color or American Indian is at least equivalent to the percentage of students who are of color or American Indian enrolled in the district, school, cooperative, or program. Where a majority of students are of color or American Indian, then a majority of those who participate in the program must be persons of color or American Indian. Priority for awarding grants must be given to programs with the highest total numbers and percentages of participants who are of color or American Indian.

(b) For the 2019-2020 school year only, the commissioner must review all applications by existing programs for continuing grants by August 1, 2019, and must notify grant recipients of the amount of the grants awarded by August 15, 2019.

(c) For the 2020-2021 school year and later, grant applications for new and existing programs must be received by the commissioner no later than December 1 of the year prior to the school year in which the grant will be used. The commissioner must review all applications and notify grant recipients by February 1 of the amount awarded.

(d) Grant recipients must spend any amounts received under this section within 18 months of receiving the grant money.

Subd. 6. Report. Programs must annually report to the commissioner of education by the date determined by the commissioner on their activities under this section, including the number of participants, the percentage of participants who are of color or who are American Indian, and an assessment of program effectiveness, including participant feedback, areas for improvement, the percentage of participants continuing to pursue teacher licensure, and the number of participants hired in the school or district as teachers after completing preparation programs. The department must also publish a report for the public that summarizes the activities and outcomes of grant recipients and what was done to promote sharing of effective practices among grant recipients.

Sec. 14. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 122A.70, is amended to read:

122A.70 TEACHER MENTORSHIP AND RETENTION OF EFFECTIVE TEACHERS.

Subdivision 1. Teacher mentoring, induction, and retention programs. (a) School districts are encouraged to develop teacher mentoring programs for teachers new to the profession or district, including teaching residents, teachers of color, teachers who are American Indian, teachers in license shortage areas, teachers with special needs, or experienced teachers in need of peer coaching.

(b) Teacher mentoring programs must be included in or aligned with districts' teacher evaluation and peer review processes under sections 122A.40, subdivision 8, and 122A.41, subdivision 5. A district may use staff development revenue under section 122A.61, special grant programs established by the legislature, or another funding source to pay a stipend to a mentor who may be a current or former teacher who has taught at least three years and is not on an improvement plan. Other initiatives using such funds or funds available under sections 124D.861 and 124D.862 may include:

(1) additional stipends as incentives to mentors who are of color or who are American Indian;

(2) financial supports for professional learning community affinity groups across schools within and between districts for teachers from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups to come together throughout the school year;

(3) programs for induction aligned with the district or school mentorship program during the first three years of teaching, especially for teachers from underrepresented racial and ethnic groups; or

(4) grants supporting licensed and nonlicensed educator participation in professional development, such as workshops and graduate courses, related to increasing student achievement for students of color and American Indian students in order to close opportunity and achievement gaps.

(c) Schools or districts may negotiate additional retention strategies or protection from layoffs in the beginning years of employment for teachers of color and teachers who are American Indian. Retention strategies may include providing financial incentives for teachers of color and teachers who are American Indian to work in the school or district for at least five years and placing American Indian educators at sites with other American Indian educators and educators of color at sites with other educators of color to reduce isolation and increase opportunity for collegial support.

Subd. 2. Applications. The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must make application forms available to sites interested in developing or expanding a mentorship program. A school district, ; a group of school districts, or ; a coalition of districts, teachers, and teacher education institutions; or a coalition of schools, teachers, or nonlicensed educators may apply for a teacher mentorship program grant. The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board, in consultation with the teacher mentoring task force, must approve or disapprove the applications. To the extent possible, the approved applications must reflect effective mentoring, professional development, and retention components, include a variety of coalitions and be geographically distributed throughout the state. The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must encourage the selected sites to consider the use of its assessment procedures.

Subd. 3. Criteria for selection. At a minimum, applicants must express commitment to:

(1) allow staff participation;

(2) assess skills of both beginning and mentor teachers;

(3) provide appropriate in-service to needs identified in the assessment;

(4) provide leadership to the effort;

(5) cooperate with higher education institutions;

(6) provide facilities and other resources;

(7) share findings, materials, and techniques with other school districts; and

(8) retain teachers of color and teachers who are American Indian.

Subd. 4. Additional funding. Applicants are required to seek additional funding and assistance from sources such as school districts, postsecondary institutions, foundations, and the private sector.

Subd. 5. Program implementation. New and expanding mentorship sites that are funded to design, develop, implement, and evaluate their program must participate in activities that support program development and implementation. The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must provide resources and assistance to support new sites in their program efforts. These activities and services may include, but are not limited to: planning, planning guides, media, training, conferences, institutes, and regional and statewide networking meetings. Nonfunded schools or districts interested in getting started may participate. Fees may be charged for meals, materials, and the like.

Subd. 6. Report. By June 30 of each year after receiving a grant, recipients must submit a report to the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board on program efforts that describes mentoring and induction activities and assesses the impact of these programs on teacher effectiveness and retention.

Sec. 15. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 124D.09, subdivision 10, is amended to read:

Subd. 10. Courses according to agreements. (a) An eligible pupil, according to subdivision 5, may enroll in a nonsectarian course taught by a secondary teacher or a postsecondary faculty member and offered at a secondary school, or another location, according to an agreement between a public school board and the governing body of an eligible public postsecondary system or an eligible private postsecondary institution, as defined in subdivision 3. All provisions of this section shall apply to a pupil, public school board, district, and the governing body of a postsecondary institution, except as otherwise provided.

(b) To encourage students, especially American Indian students and students of color, to consider teaching as a profession, participating schools, school districts, and postsecondary institutions are encouraged to develop and offer an "Introduction to Teaching" or "Introduction to Education" course under this subdivision. An institution that receives a For the purpose of applying for grants under this paragraph, "eligible institution" includes schools and districts that partner with an accredited college or university in addition to postsecondary institutions identified in subdivision 3, paragraph (a). Grant to develop a course recipients under this paragraph must annually report to the commissioner in a form and manner determined by the commissioner on the participation rates of students in courses under this paragraph, including the number of students who apply for admission to colleges or universities with teacher preparation programs and the number of students of color and American Indian students who earned postsecondary credit. Grant recipients must also describe recruiting efforts intended to ensure that the percentage of participating students who are of color or American Indian meets or exceeds the overall percentage of students of color or American Indian students in the school.

Sec. 16. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 124D.861, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

Subd. 2. Plan implementation; components. (a) The school board of each eligible district must formally develop and implement a long-term plan under this section. The plan must be incorporated into the district's comprehensive strategic plan under section 120B.11. Plan components may include:

(1) innovative and integrated prekindergarten through grade 12 learning environments that offer students school enrollment choices;

(2) family engagement initiatives that involve families in their students' academic life and success;

(3) professional development opportunities for teachers and administrators focused on improving the academic achievement of all students, including teachers and administrators who are members of populations underrepresented among the licensed teachers or administrators in the district or school and who reflect the diversity of students under section 120B.35, subdivision 3, paragraph (b), clause (2), who are enrolled in the district or school;

(4) increased programmatic opportunities and effective and more diverse instructors focused on rigor and college and career readiness for underserved students, including students enrolled in alternative learning centers under section 123A.05, public alternative programs under section 126C.05, subdivision 15, and contract alternative programs under section 124D.69, among other underserved students; or

(5) recruitment and retention of teachers and , administrators with diverse , cultural and family liaisons, paraprofessionals, and other nonlicensed staff from racial and ethnic backgrounds represented in the student population.

(b) The plan must contain goals for:

(1) reducing the disparities in academic achievement and in equitable access to effective and more diverse teachers among all students and specific categories of students under section 120B.35, subdivision 3, paragraph (b), excluding the student categories of gender, disability, and English learners; and

(2) increasing racial and economic diversity and integration in schools and districts.

(c) The plan must include strategies to make schools' curriculum and learning and work environments more inclusive and respectful of students' racial and ethnic diversity and to address issues of structural inequities in schools that create opportunity and achievement gaps for students, families, and staff who are of color or who are American Indian, and program revenues may be used to implement such strategies. Examples of possible structural inequities include but are not limited to policies and practices that unintentionally result in disparate referrals and suspension, inequitable access to advanced coursework, overrepresentation in lower level coursework, participation in cocurricular activities, parent involvement, and lack of access to diverse teachers. Plans may include but are not limited to the following activities that may involve collaboration with or support from regional centers of excellence:

(1) creating opportunities for students, families, staff, and community members who are of color or who are American Indian to share their experiences in the school setting with school staff and administration to develop specific proposals for improving school environments to be more inclusive and respectful toward all students, families, and staff;

(2) implementing creative programs for increased parent engagement and improving relations between home and school;

(3) developing or expanding ethnic studies course offerings to provide all students with in-depth opportunities to learn about their own and others' cultures and historical experiences;

(4) examining and revising curricula in various subjects to be culturally relevant and inclusive of various racial and ethnic groups;

(5) examining academic and discipline data, reexamining institutional policies and practices that result in opportunity and achievement disparities between racial and ethnic groups, and making necessary changes that increase access, meaningful participation, representation, and positive outcomes for students of color, American Indian students, and students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunch;

(6) providing professional development opportunities to learn more about various racial and ethnic groups' experiences, assets, and issues and developing cross-cultural competence with knowledge, collaborations, and relationships needed to serve students effectively who are from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds; or

(7) hiring more cultural liaisons to strengthen relationships with students, families, and other members of the community.

(b) (d) Among other requirements, an eligible district must implement effective, research-based interventions that include formative assessment practices to reduce the disparities in student academic performance among the specific categories of students as measured by student progress and growth on state reading and math assessments and as aligned with section 120B.11.

(c) (e) Eligible districts must create efficiencies and eliminate duplicative programs and services under this section, which may include forming collaborations or a single, seven-county metropolitan areawide partnership of eligible districts for this purpose.

Sec. 17. [136A.1274] ASPIRING MINNESOTA TEACHERS OF COLOR SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM.

Subdivision 1. Scholarship program established. The commissioner must establish a scholarship program to support undergraduate or graduate students preparing to become teachers and belonging to a racial or ethnic group underrepresented in the teacher workforce who have demonstrated financial need.

Subd. 2. Eligibility. To be eligible for a scholarship under this section, a teacher candidate must:

(1) be admitted and enrolled in a teacher preparation program approved by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board and be seeking initial licensure or enrolled in an eligible institution under section 136A.103, completing a two-year program specifically designed to prepare early childhood educators;

(2) self-identify to the teacher preparation program as a person of color or American Indian;

(3) be meeting satisfactory academic progress as defined under section 136A.101, subdivision 10; and

(4) have an adjusted gross family income of $125,000 or less and demonstrate financial need.

Subd. 3. Administration. (a) The commissioner must establish an application process for individual students and institutions on behalf of all eligible students at the institution and other guidelines for implementing the scholarship program.

(b) The maximum scholarship amount is $10,000 per year for full-time study prior to student teaching defined as 12 or more undergraduate credits or the number of credits determined by the institution for full-time graduate student status. If a student is admitted and enrolled in a program for one term during the academic year, the maximum scholarship amount is $5,000. The minimum scholarship under this section for full-time study must be no less than $1,000 per year. The amount determined must be reduced and prorated per credit for part-time study. The maximum total amount of a scholarship per candidate is $25,000 in a lifetime.

(c) Established amounts are not rulemaking for purposes of chapter 14 or section 14.386.

(d) Scholarships must be paid to the teacher preparation institution on behalf of the candidate after the institution has informed the office of candidates' names, self-identified racial and ethnic identities, gender, licensure area sought, and full-time or part-time status.

EFFECTIVE DATE. This section is effective July 1, 2019, and initial grants must be awarded by November 1, 2019.

Sec. 18. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 136A.1275, is amended to read:

136A.1275 STUDENT TEACHER CANDIDATE GRANTS IN SHORTAGE AREAS.

Subdivision 1. Establishment. (a) The commissioner of the Office of Higher Education must establish a grant program for student teaching stipends for low-income students enrolled in a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board-approved teacher preparation program who intend to teach are student teaching in a licensure shortage area after graduating and receiving their teaching license or belong to an underrepresented a racial or ethnic group underrepresented in the teacher workforce.

(b) "Shortage For purposes of this grant program, "licensure shortage area" means a license field or economic development region within Minnesota defined as a shortage area by the Department of Education using determined by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board in which the number of surveyed districts or schools within an economic development region reporting or predicting hiring a teacher for a specific licensure area as "very difficult" is equal to or greater than the number of districts or schools reporting or predicting such hiring as "easy" in data collected for the teacher supply and demand report under section 127A.05, subdivision 6, or other surveys conducted by the Department of Education or Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board that provide indicators for teacher supply and demand.

Subd. 2. Eligibility. To be eligible for a grant under this section, a student teacher candidate must:

(1) be enrolled in a Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board-approved teacher preparation program that requires at least 12 weeks of student teaching to complete the program in order to be recommended for a full professional any Tier 3 teaching license from early childhood through grade 12;

(2) demonstrate financial need based on criteria established by the commissioner under subdivision 3;

(3) intend to teach in be completing a program in a licensure shortage area existing within the economic development region where either the candidate's preparation program or permanent residence is located, or belong to an underrepresented a racial or ethnic group underrepresented in Minnesota's teacher workforce; and

(4) be meeting satisfactory academic progress as defined under section 136A.101, subdivision 10.

Subd. 3. Administration; repayment. (a) The commissioner must establish an application process and other guidelines for implementing this program, including repayment responsibilities for stipend recipients who do not complete student teaching or who leave Minnesota to teach in another state during the first year after student teaching.

(b) The commissioner must determine each academic year the stipend amount up to $7,500 based on the amount of available funding, the number of eligible applicants, and the financial need of the applicants.

(c) In order to help improve all students' access to effective and diverse teachers, the percentage of the total award reserved for teacher candidates who identify as belonging to an underrepresented a racial or ethnic group underrepresented in the Minnesota teacher workforce must be equal to or greater than the total percentage of students of from all such underrepresented racial or ethnic groups as measured under section 120B.35, subdivision 3. If this percentage cannot be met because of a lack of qualifying candidates, the remaining amount may be awarded to teacher candidates who intend to teach in a shortage area. Student teacher candidates who are of color or American Indian who have made satisfactory academic progress must have priority for receiving a grant from available funds to student teach and complete their preparation programs if they meet eligibility requirements and participated in the aspiring Minnesota teachers of color scholarship program under section 136A.1274.

Sec. 19. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 136A.1791, subdivision 1, is amended to read:

Subdivision 1. Definitions. (a) The terms used in this section have the meanings given them in this subdivision.

(b) "Qualified educational loan" means a government, commercial, or foundation loan for actual costs paid for tuition and reasonable educational and living expenses related to a teacher's preparation or further education.

(c) "School district" means an independent school district, special school district, intermediate district, education district, special education cooperative, service cooperative, a cooperative center for vocational education, or a charter school located in Minnesota.

(d) "Teacher" means an individual holding a teaching license issued by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board who is employed by a school district to provide classroom instruction or a Head Start or Early Head Start nonlicensed early childhood professional employed by a Head Start program under section 119A.50.

(e) "Teacher shortage area" means any of the following experiencing a teacher shortage as reported by the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board:

(1) the licensure fields and specific to particular economic development regions reported by the commissioner of education as experiencing a teacher shortage; and ;

(2) individual economic development regions; or

(3) economic development regions where there is a shortage of licensed teachers who reflect the racial or ethnic diversity of are of color or who are American Indian where the aggregate percentage of this group of teachers is lower than the aggregate percentage of students of color and American Indian students in the region as reported by the commissioner of education.

(f) "Commissioner" means the commissioner of the Office of Higher Education unless indicated otherwise.

Sec. 20. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 136A.1791, subdivision 2, is amended to read:

Subd. 2. Program established; administration. The commissioner shall must establish and administer a teacher shortage loan forgiveness program. A teacher is eligible for the program if the teacher is teaching in an identified teacher shortage area for the economic development region in which the teacher works as defined in subdivision 1 and reportedunder subdivision 3 and complies with the requirements of this section.

Sec. 21. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 136A.1791, subdivision 3, is amended to read:

Subd. 3. Use of report on teacher shortage areas. The commissioner of education shall Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must use the teacher supply and demand report to the legislature to identify the licensure fields and racial or ethnic groups in economic development regions in Minnesota experiencing a teacher shortage.

Sec. 22. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 136A.1791, subdivision 4, is amended to read:

Subd. 4. Application for loan forgiveness. Each applicant for loan forgiveness, according to rules adopted by the commissioner, shall must:

(1) apply for teacher shortage loan forgiveness and promptly submit any additional information required by the commissioner; and

(2) submit to the commissioner a completed affidavit, prescribed by the commissioner, affirming the teacher is teaching in: (i) a licensure field identified by the commissioner as experiencing a teacher shortage; or (ii) an economic development region identified by the commissioner as experiencing a teacher shortage a shortage area.

Sec. 23. Minnesota Statutes 2018, section 136A.1791, subdivision 5, is amended to read:

Subd. 5. Amount of loan forgiveness. (a) To the extent funding is available, the annual amount of teacher shortage loan forgiveness for an approved applicant shall as a teacher in any shortage area must not exceed $1,000 $2,000 or the cumulative balance of the applicant's qualified educational loans, including principal and interest, whichever amount is less. To support the retention of teachers who are of color or American Indian and to the extent there are sufficient applications, the percentage of loan repayments granted to teachers of color and American Indian teachers must at least be equivalent to the aggregated percentage of students of color and American Indian students in the state.

(b) Notwithstanding paragraph (a), applicants who meet both licensure field and underrepresented racial or ethnic group eligibility in their economic development region may receive an annual amount of up to $4,000 or the cumulative balance of the applicant's qualified educational loans, including principal and interest, whichever amount is less.

(b) (c) Recipients must secure their own qualified educational loans. Teachers who graduate from an approved teacher preparation program or teachers who add a licensure field, consistent with the teacher shortage requirements of this section, are eligible to apply for the loan forgiveness program.

(c) (d) No teacher shall may receive more than five ten annual awards.

Sec. 24. APPROPRIATIONS.

Subdivision 1. Department of Education. The sums indicated in this section are appropriated from the general fund to the Department of Education for the fiscal years designated.

Subd. 2. Inclusive school enhancement grants. (a) To support schools in their efforts to close opportunity and achievement gaps under Minnesota Statutes, section 120B.113:

$ 3,000,000 ..... 2020
$ 3,000,000 ..... 2021

(b) The department may use up to five percent of this appropriation to administer the grant program.

Subd. 3. Come Teach in Minnesota hiring bonuses. (a) For the Come Teach in Minnesota hiring bonuses program under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.59:

$ 1,050,000 ..... 2020
$ 1,050,000 ..... 2021

(b) The department may use up to five percent of the appropriation amount to administer the program under this subdivision.

(c) Any balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year.

(d) The base appropriation for fiscal years 2022 and 2023 is $1,050,000. The base appropriation for fiscal year 2024 and later when retention bonuses can start being paid through this program is $2,100,000.

Subd. 4. American Indian teacher preparation grants. (a) For joint grants to assist American Indian people to become teachers under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.63:

$ 600,000 ..... 2020
$ 600,000 ..... 2021

(b) The department may use up to five percent of the appropriation amount to administer the grant program.

Subd. 5. Collaborative urban and greater Minnesota educators of color grants. (a) For transfer to the collaborative urban and greater Minnesota educators of color competitive account under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.635, subdivision 4:

$ 6,000,000 ..... 2020
$ 6,000,000 ..... 2021

(b) The board may retain up to three percent of the appropriation amount to monitor and administer the grant program, and a portion of these funds may be transferred to the Office of Higher Education as determined by the executive director of the board and commissioner to support the administration of the program.

Subd. 6. Grow Your Own pathways to teacher licensure grants. (a) For grants to develop or expand Grow Your Own new teacher programs under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.685:

$ 8,500,000 ..... 2020
$ 8,500,000 ..... 2021

(b) Of this amount in each fiscal year, $3,500,000 is for nonconventional teacher residency programs under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.685, subdivision 3.

(c) Of this amount in each fiscal year, $5,000,000 is for expanded Grow Your Own programs under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.685, subdivision 4.

(d) The department may retain up to three percent of the appropriation amount to monitor and administer the grant program.

(e) Any balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year.

(f) The base appropriation for fiscal year 2022 and later is $10,000,000.

Subd. 7. Mentoring, induction, and retention incentive program grants for teachers of color. (a) For transfer to the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board for the development and expansion of mentoring, induction, and retention programs for teachers of color or American Indian teachers under Minnesota Statutes, section 122A.70:

$ 2,000,000 ..... 2020
$ 2,000,000 ..... 2021

(b) The board must be allocated no more than five percent of the appropriation amount for monitoring and administering the grant program, and may have an interagency agreement with the Department of Education including transfer of funds to help administer the program.

(c) The base appropriation for fiscal year 2022 and later is $2,000,000.

Subd. 8. Expanded concurrent enrollment grants. (a) For grants to institutions offering "Introduction to Teaching" or "Introduction to Education" college in the schools courses under Minnesota Statutes, section 124D.09, subdivision 10, paragraph (b):

$ 500,000 ..... 2020
$ 500,000 ..... 2021

(b) The department must be allocated no more than five percent of the appropriation amount for monitoring and administering the grant program.

Subd. 9. Aspiring Minnesota teachers of color scholarships. (a) For transfer to the Office of Higher Education for scholarships to candidates preparing to teach in licensure or demographic shortage areas under Minnesota Statutes, section 136A.1274:

$ 10,150,000 ..... 2020
$ 16,150,000 ..... 2021

(b) The Office of Higher Education may use no more than $150,000 of the appropriation amount to administer the program under this subdivision.

(c) Any balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year.

(d) The base appropriation for fiscal year 2022 and later is $16,150,000.

Subd. 10. Student teacher candidate grants in shortage areas. (a) For transfer to the Office of Higher Education for the student teacher candidate grants in shortage areas program under Minnesota Statutes, section 136A.1275, directed to support candidates belonging to a racial or ethnic group underrepresented in the teacher workforce and meeting other eligibility requirements:

$ 2,317,500 ..... 2020
$ 3,100,000 ..... 2021

(b) The Office of Higher Education may use no more than $100,000 of the appropriation amount to administer the program under this subdivision.

(c) Any balance in the first year does not cancel and is available in the second year.

(d) The base appropriation for fiscal year 2022 and later for candidates belonging to a racial or ethnic group underrepresented in the teacher workforce is $4,600,000.

Subd. 11. Teacher shortage loan forgiveness program. (a) For transfer to the Office of Higher Education for the teacher shortage loan forgiveness program under Minnesota Statutes, section 136A.1791, specific to teachers defined in Minnesota Statutes, section 136A.1791, subdivision 1, paragraph (e), clause (3):

$ 2,000,000 ..... 2020
$ 2,000,000 ..... 2021

(b) The Office of Higher Education may use no more than three percent of the appropriation amount to administer the program under this subdivision.

(c) The base appropriation for fiscal year 2022 and later is $5,000,000.

Subd. 12. Teacher recruitment marketing campaign. (a) For transfer to the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board for developing two contracts to develop and implement an outreach and marketing campaign under this subdivision:

$ 500,000 ..... 2020
$ 500,000 ..... 2021

(b) The Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board must issue a request for proposals to develop and implement an outreach and marketing campaign to elevate the profession and recruit teachers, especially teachers of color and American Indian teachers. Outreach efforts should include and support current and former Teacher of the Year finalists interested in being recruitment fellows to encourage prospective educators throughout the state.

(c) The outreach and marketing campaign must focus on making the following individuals become interested in teaching in Minnesota public schools:

(1) high school and college students of color or American Indian students who have not chosen a career path; or

(2) adults from racial or ethnic groups underrepresented in the teacher workforce who may be seeking to change careers.

(d) The board must award two $250,000 grants each year to firms or organizations that demonstrate capacity to reach wide and varied audiences of prospective teachers based on a work plan with quarterly deliverables. Preferences should be given to firms or organizations that are led by people of color and that have people of color working on the campaign with a proven record of success. The grant recipients must recognize current pathways or programs to become a teacher and must partner with educators, schools, institutions, and racially diverse communities. The grant recipients are encouraged to provide in-kind contributions or seek funds from nonstate sources to supplement the grant award.

(e) The board may use no more than three percent of the appropriation amount to administer the program under this subdivision, and may have an interagency agreement with the Department of Education including transfer of funds to help administer the program.

(f) Any balance in the first year does not cancel but is available in the second year.

Subd. 13. Reports on increasing percentage of teachers of color and American Indian teachers. (a) For transfer to the Professional Educator Licensing and Standards Board for annual reports regarding efforts to increase the percentage of teachers of color and American Indian teachers in Minnesota schools pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, section 120B.117, subdivision 4:

$ 15,000 ..... 2020

(b) The base appropriation for fiscal year 2022 and each even-numbered later fiscal year is $15,000.

EFFECTIVE DATE. This section is effective July 1, 2019.


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